Water Markets

Water is the silent currency that runs through the global economy. In a world of approximately seven billion people—with three billion new consumers coming on stage by 2030—and over $70 trillion of global production, vast amounts of water are needed to irrigate our crops, cool our power plants, supply our manufacturing and support our cities.
WV Wilderness
We are staring down a future that may require as much as 40 percent more water than today’s accessible supply. Our traditional practices are proving increasingly unsustainable. In many places, growing demands for water are running into the limitations of what nature can easily yield to us, and the cost of delivering an additional liter of water is increasing.

Water markets—which reward the more efficient use of water by establishing water’s unique value as an asset—are emerging as a viable approach to managing water supplies more sustainably and productively. Water Sharing Investment Partnerships, developed by The Nature Conservancy’s conservation investing unit, NatureVest, as well as it Global Water team, utilize the framework provided by water markets to help rebalance water use for the benefit of freshwater ecosystems and underserved groups while continuing to support the agricultural communities whose livelihoods rely on this important resource. By becoming an active participant in the water markets, community water trusts are also able to benefit from the underlying financial appreciation of water as an asset.

Our Projects

Murray-Darling Basin Balanced Water Fund

April 22, 2016

Deal Team Leads

Jacob Davis – Manager, Freshwater Transaction Origination

May 18, 2015

Lauren Ferstandig

Lauren Ferstandig – Senior Director, Product Development

May 18, 2015

Charlotte Kaiser

Charlotte Kaiser – Deputy Managing Director, NatureVest

May 18, 2015

Additional Materials

Investing in Our Water Future
Investing in Our Water Future: A Role for Impact Investment in Water Security

Water Report Image
Water Share Report: Investing our way out of the global water crisis 

Top image: © Drew Kelly. Image credits: © Kent Mason.